2-1-1. H. Poincaré to Joseph Sweetman Ames

[Ca. 02.1903]11The document bears a Carnegie Institution date stamp, ‘‘MAR 28 1903’’, and a pencilled annotation, ‘‘From DCG’’, suggesting that the letter was transmitted to Daniel Coit Gilman. Gilman (1831–1908) served as the first President of Johns Hopkins University from 1876 to 1891, and as President of the Carnegie Institution of Washington from 1902 to 1904. The typed transcription begins with the sentence: ‘‘Substance of a letter from Professor Poincaré to Prof. Ames.’’

I congratulate myself more and more in having taken the initiative in bringing to Paris Mr. Pender. The results already obtained do not allow any further doubt that this question, so controverted, is going to be cleared up, most probably according to the views of Mr. Rowland. The experiments of Mr. Pender have been repeated successfully besides they have operated with two disks nus … and the results have been still more positive …. There remain still further questions to be settled from which it is necessary that Mr. Pender should remain somewhat longer in Paris and it would be very desirable that he should bring before the Society of Physics, after Easter, in connection with Mr. Cremieu, the results obtained.22On these experiments see the correspondence with Victor Crémieu and Harold Pender presented the results of their collaboration on 17.04.1903 to the Société française de physique, confirming those obtained earlier by Pender (Pender & Crémieu 1903). If you can get from the Carnegie Institution a further subvention allowing this prolongation of Mr. Pender’s absence all the friends of science will be very grateful.

TTrL 1p. Harold Pender file, Carnegie Institution of Washington.

Time-stamp: "19.03.2015 01:57"

References

  • H. Pender and V. Crémieu (1903) Recherches contradictoires sur l’effet magnétique de la convection électrique. Bulletin des séances de la Société française de physique, pp. 136–162. Cited by: 2-1-1. H. Poincaré to Joseph Sweetman Ames.